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 Post subject: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 16th, 2017, 10:09 pm 
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Location: Chicago
All, I need some guidance. A friend of mine wants to try etuffee. It is my understanding that etuffee is traditionally made with mudbugs. She, however, is very allergic to crustaceans.

What protein would you recommend as a substitute? Any other thoughts or recommendations? I'll also check out some cookbooks of course, but I thought I'd start with the experts.


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 Post subject: Re: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 16th, 2017, 10:55 pm 
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Greetings, Lee. Glad you asked this. So, might I join you in awaiting responses from the experts here?

Not be selfish, but the responses will be especially useful for me to pass on to a dear friend who also suffers a crustacean allergy. During one phone visit with her, she allowed as how diced chicken breast-meat filled the bill as a suitable substitute for her...Here's waving at you, and thanks again..


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 Post subject: Re: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 16th, 2017, 11:17 pm 
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Joined: June 6th, 2009, 1:51 pm
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Location: Sandbox
Probably the most common etouffée is crawfish. (Most people who eat them don't call them mudbugs.) Second would be shrimp. Alas, both are crustaceans.

Ben's idea about diced chicken doesn't sound bad.

Or you could try diced tilapia (or sole?), or just about any mild flavored fish.

(Did y'all see dat awtickle about the restaurant in Santa Clara County, CA that lost a big lawsuit for serving tilapia when the menu said it was sole? Apparently they settled out of court and had to pay $90,000 in civil penalties and give a $30 coupon to each of the estimated 1,000 customers they scammed. I couldn't find the article I saw yesterday that actually used the term "bait-and-switch" but here is a link to one of them: http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/02/15/p ... re-eating/)


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 Post subject: Re: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 17th, 2017, 9:04 am 
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This recipe is really tasty:

http://emerils.com/124498/chicken-%C3%A9touff%C3%A9e


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 Post subject: Re: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 17th, 2017, 12:00 pm 
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Lee...

Being born to a Cajun mother,
I ate étouffée (ay to fay) many years before it became restaurant fare.
Étouffée merely means "Smothered"
I remember her cooking SEVEN STEAK ÉTOUFFÉE...
long before crawfish appeared on restaurant menus.
My sister cooks that dish to this day.

A BIT OF HISTORY FOUND ON WIKIPEDIA:
(... CHICAGO???... :roll: :o :lol: )


The dish originated at DeJonghe's Hotel and Restaurant in CHICAGO. Around the 1950s, crawfish etouffée was introduced to restaurant goers in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana; however, the dish may have been invented as early as the late 1920s, according to some sources.[6][7] Originally, crawfish étouffée was a popular dish amongst Cajuns in the bayous and backwaters of Louisiana. Around 1983, a waiter at the popular Bourbon Street restaurant Galatoire's brought the dish to his boss to try. At the time, most New Orleans restaurants served French Creole cuisine, but this Cajun dish was a hit.[8]

aboy

_________________
If there was no New Orleans, America would just be a bunch of free people dying of boredom."
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 Post subject: Re: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 17th, 2017, 12:05 pm 
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Lee...

Does that hotel and restaurant still operate in the Windy City?
I guess I could Google, but a first hand report would be great.

Thanks,
aboy

UPDATE:...
pedigree of Chicagoan cuisine, having originated in the late 19th or early 20th century at
DeJonghe's Hotel and Restaurant, 12 E. Monroe St. (1899–1923).

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If there was no New Orleans, America would just be a bunch of free people dying of boredom."
Judy Deck in an e-mail sent to Chris Rose”


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 Post subject: Re: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 17th, 2017, 12:28 pm 
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Joined: August 26th, 2011, 5:15 pm
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aboy wrote:
Lee...

Being born to a Cajun mother,
I ate étouffée (ay to fay) many years before it became restaurant fare.
Étouffée merely means "Smothered"
I remember her cooking SEVEN STEAK ÉTOUFFÉE...
long before crawfish appeared on restaurant menus.
My sister cooks that dish to this day.

A BIT OF HISTORY FOUND ON WIKIPEDIA:
(... CHICAGO???... :roll: :o :lol: )


The dish originated at DeJonghe's Hotel and Restaurant in CHICAGO. Around the 1950s, crawfish etouffée was introduced to restaurant goers in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana; however, the dish may have been invented as early as the late 1920s, according to some sources.[6][7] Originally, crawfish étouffée was a popular dish amongst Cajuns in the bayous and backwaters of Louisiana. Around 1983, a waiter at the popular Bourbon Street restaurant Galatoire's brought the dish to his boss to try. At the time, most New Orleans restaurants served French Creole cuisine, but this Cajun dish was a hit.[8]

aboy


hey, we all know BBQ wouldn't exist without that Chicago connection.

Tell me more about this steak version please....


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 Post subject: Re: Etuffee
New postPosted: February 17th, 2017, 10:43 pm 
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Seems Mr.Smith has offered up a capital Idea: I'd bet some Washingtons on his rec of chicken thighs-- assuming they are bone-in first, then the meat is trimmed/pulled away from the bones: Two reasons, at least for me: 1) bones transport flavor in most any meat cut and 2) when I'm scarfing etoufe or any other fare, except steaks, I don't want "objects" (read: bones) in the way.

Lee, my good man, as a BBQ aficionado -- and here's a rare chest thump from my ownself's self -- when I worked in Corporate America, I would, once and again, treat the executive staff to BBQ -- mostly brisket. One colleague eventually told me he'd invest his hard-earned money in a BBQ venture with me. I declined. But against that backdrop, I have to offer a tsk, tsk at your 'hey we all know that BBQ would not exist without that Chicago connection,' or words to that effect. Don't you do me dat!...Good thang native Texans, many of them first-rate BBQ'ers, don't see this; nor, your claim might cause a stampede moving out from Kansa City, or the Carolinas or, mercy, with Memphis hogging into the picture.

Next time You're at Chicago's Smoke Daddy jernt, ya might ask 'em if Louisiana ex-pat bluesman Buddy Guy has been by....And Lee, when you're next in The City, put The Joint (damn good BBQ) in New Orleans on your itinerary....Can't chicken out without a song: Here's hoping You and Yours are faring the weather well, as the late, great Lou Rawls once sang of it about 'the windy city' and Dallasite flautist Bobbi Humphrey once found it so cold there that she and crew cobbled -- and recorded -- 'Chicago, Dam!'...Thanks Lee for the 'sidelines' visit and am wishing you well with your etouffe efforts. Please let the Forum now the outcome.


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