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 Post subject: Progress (?) in Old Metairie
New postPosted: August 25th, 2013, 12:51 pm 
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Joined: June 6th, 2009, 1:51 pm
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Location: Sandbox
My SIL just emailed me some news. The lot that used to have the house I mostly grew up in is now undergoing new construction. It sat vacant for almost two years after we sold it when Mama died, and the new owner invested what we couldn't to have the old 1950 rancher torn down. Now it's going to have a McMansion priced at $257 per square foot!

Talk about mixed feelings!

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhom ... 5754?row=1


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 Post subject: Re: Progress (?) in Old Metairie
New postPosted: August 26th, 2013, 2:30 pm 
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Did they chop down the old trees?

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 Post subject: Re: Progress (?) in Old Metairie
New postPosted: August 27th, 2013, 11:23 am 
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I don't know. :(

Last I saw there were still 2 of the 4 magnolias that my father, elder brother and I planted in 1964 to replace the big old hackberry trees we used to have front and back. In the late 1950s or early 1960s, hackberry trees were dying all over the city from something analogous to Dutch elm disease, and all the arborists said you should take them down now while it can be done safely. So we got rid of the hackberry trees, and of course all the hackberry trees in the city were then miraculously cured. I learned to ride a bicycle without training wheels by leaning it on the hackberry tree, climbing on, and pushing off.

To get us some shade, Daddy went to a nursery across the lake with a rented trailer four times and came back with magnolia trees. My brother and I were in high school and just getting the muscles that come with testosterone poisoning, and Daddy put us to work. These trees were 18-20' tall and had 6' diameter root balls, much bigger than would normally be transplanted, but Daddy had faith in our ability to follow his directions. We worked our butts off to get them planted properly, three in front, one in back.

During Betsy when they started leaning badly we went out front roped together in the wind with stakes, turnbuckles, and 5-strand wire cushioned with the standard pieces of garden hose to avoid injuring the bark, and put up guy lines that kept the trees from blowing over. After the storm we put our backs into them, got them to vertical, and kept them guyed for a month or so. The trees all survived, but the one farthest south didn't grow for the next 10 years or so.

Over the years we had to get rid of the one in the middle because it was tearing up the drain lines, and quite some time after we sold the house the one on the north side near the sidewalk, that had been planted a foot inside the property line but ended up straddling it, was finally taken down, although it still shows in the Google Maps street view.

The one on the south end went in a few feet from the property line, so it hasn't grown enough to encroach, and was only a few feet from the sidewalk, so if the site plan for the new house had any kind of front yard, there was room for it.

There would have been no reason to take down the one in back unless the footprint of the house just went too far back from the street. The whole time the vacant lot was for sale, there was a protective fence around that tree. It would be a shame to lose it because it has a big fork maybe six feet up that makes it an excellent climbing tree. If a kid was tall enough to reach the fork s/he was probably old enough to climb safely.

In case you couldn't tell, I miss those trees. In May the world smelled like magnolia blossoms.


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 Post subject: Re: Progress (?) in Old Metairie
New postPosted: August 27th, 2013, 3:15 pm 
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Joined: October 18th, 2011, 4:51 pm
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Location: Metairie
Here's a view of the lot...looks like 2 magnolias near the sidewalk:
http://www.trulia.com/property/10465343 ... e-LA-70005

Real estate has gone crazy around there.
We were looking for a rental and around old Metairie a shotgun rents for the same as a 3 br, 2 bath home with garage west of Clearview.


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