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 Post subject: Holy Oenophiles, Batman!
New postPosted: November 11th, 2017, 12:12 am 
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Betcha By Golly, Wow, that the Deep-Pockets buyer pays no attention to corkage fees! Holy Jeroboam, Batman! The City, via Chef Lagasse (who seems intent on promoting Florida's food/hospitality industry these days.)

And to think: some of Us with shallow pockets must toast with, say, a lower-priced Reisling.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/ ... spartandhp


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 Post subject: Re: Holy Oenophiles, Batman!
New postPosted: November 11th, 2017, 1:19 am 
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Joined: June 6th, 2009, 1:51 pm
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Location: Sandbox
I think the price had as much to do with the charity as the wine, but it's still a staggering sum.


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 Post subject: Re: Holy Oenophiles, Batman!
New postPosted: November 11th, 2017, 2:48 pm 
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Joined: August 24th, 2011, 4:59 pm
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Location: High Desert Near Reno Nevada
A 2015 "Cab" isn't even ready for tasting, let alone drinking. This high priced auction has nothing to do with wine quality. Only charity, people, politics and/or hype.

These are quality, high prices wines:

1. CHÂTEAU LAFITE, 1787 — $156,450
Okay, so, yes, 1787 is ancient, especially considering this bottle of Bordeaux at this price was sold in 1985. Why the hefty price tag? Well, this particular bottle had the initial Th.J. etched into it. That's right, Jefferson was a hard-core oenophile.
Price per glass: $26,075

2. JEROBOAM OF CHÂTEAU MOUTON-ROTHSCHILD, 1945 — $310,700
By the way, 1945 is considered one of the very best vintages of the 20th century and Mouton-Rothschild one the world's greatest clarets. If you ever happen upon a bottle, don't drink it!
Price per glass: $8,631

3. INGLENOOK CABERNET SAUVIGNON NAPA VALLEY, 1941 — $24,675
Sold in 2004, this Cabernet is regarded as the most expensive bottle of American wine ever sold. Inglenook is now known as Rubicon and owned by Francis Ford Coppola. A robust wine that had just finished fermentation at the time of Pearl Harbor." Talk about seeing the glass half-full.
Price per glass: $4,113

4. CHÂTEAU MARGAUX, 1787 — $225,000
Well, this bottle actually resides in the Most Expensive Bottle of Wine Never Sold category. That's right, I said never sold. In 1989, the bottle collided with a tray at a wine dinner and New York wine merchant William Sokolin collected $225,000 from insurance! (He was seeking a whopping half a million for the bottle, which, they claimed, had also been owned by Thomas Jefferson.)
Price per glass: $37,500

5. KRUG, 1928 — $21,200
The champagne record has been broken often in the last decade. In 2005, it was a bottle of Krug 1953 that went for $12,925. Then, that same year, a Methuselah (6 liter bottle) of Louis Roederer, Cristal Brut 1990, Millenium 2000 sold for $17,625. Finally, the Krug 1928 75cl bottle was sold at Acker Merrall & Condit's first Hong Kong auction in 2009. Must be some sort of bubbly!



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 Post subject: Re: Holy Oenophiles, Batman!
New postPosted: November 14th, 2017, 1:03 am 
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To add a related article to this topic, here is one that reminds me of the late, great, Justin Wilson, who opined that the right kind of wine to go with a meal is the kind you like. This makes a lot of sense to me, and it's no surprise that the research generally supported this advice.

This is why you should just order the wine you like when dining out

Picking out wine at a restaurant can be an intimidating experience. After all, you want to make sure you select something you’ll like, and that can be tough if you’ve never tried the options on the menu. And while sommeliers or servers can help, they often make recommendations based on what they enjoy or the food you’re eating — which doesn’t necessarily synch up with your own tastes.

But a new study published in the International Journal of Wine Business Research suggests that we’re going about this this all wrong. Instead of choosing wine based on what you’re eating, the researchers discovered that picking a bottle based on your “vinotype,” i.e., wine categories that each person tends to prefer, was much more accurate. Vinotypes are based on your genetics, your environment, and your experiences, which explains why your tastes can change over time.

For "the rest of the story" click here: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/just-or ... 35090.html


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